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Archive for the ‘jacqueline kennedy’ Category

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Written by alexgfrank

April 18, 2010 at 8:19 pm

>iPhone Jackie O

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Written by alexgfrank

February 2, 2010 at 7:40 pm

>Up(tight)town

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>After stopping by Jackie’s apartment building, I made it into the Met a couple of days ago, spent most of my time in the Michael Rockefeller wing, and managed to take some pics:

An Aztec stamp

An Egyptian funeral boat

Written by alexgfrank

May 8, 2009 at 2:54 am

>the drools of attraction

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Written by alexgfrank

March 23, 2009 at 1:35 am

>Philadelphia!!!!

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>I liked Philadelphia. It was cheap, there was lots of personal space, and I saw a Sonics cover band!!!!! I also had the “Bike Shop Special” from Satelite Cafe in West Philadelphia – bagel, pesto, roasted red pepper, and cream cheese that was to die for and only $2!!!

Written by alexgfrank

January 5, 2009 at 5:33 pm

>My President is on ACID

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>Mary Pinchot Meyer was one of JFK’s many mistresses, a sort of post-Beat, pre-Hippie, who, sources claim, brought weed and LSD to the White House, and tried desperately hard to get the President to do pyschedelics. The world was a changing place, and I imagine JFK and Marilyn Monroe would have had a big role to play in it. It seems like Mary Pinchot Meyer would have too, but she mysteriously died rather mysteriously in Washington, “eleven months after John F. Kennedy’s assassination and two weeks after the Warren Commission.” What the world have been like if key people hadn’t died (although a lot of people would argue that JFK’s assassination was a partial impetus for a lot of change) is an interesting story to think about. Here’s some info about her LSD trysts:

DT: Well, Mary Meyer met JFK when they were both in prep school. She started off very much a blueblood from the very prominent Pinchot family. Then she married this CIA official, Cord Meyer. And she divorced him as he became more and more right wing. She was going in the opposite direction, politically. By the early 60s, Mary Meyer was kind of a pre-hippie hippie. She was an artist and a painter living in Georgetown. And she had divorced her husband and she was having an affair with the President. And I think it was quite a serious relationship — it wasn’t one of these fiddle-and-faddle kind of flings that Kennedy would have.

He was really deeply into Mary Meyer (in more ways than one). And in this idyllic period in the early ’60s, she was taken with the idea that peace, love and drugs could change the world. Specifically, she was out to turn on the world’s leaders to the idea that they don’t have to be in a constant state of war. So she went to Harvard, where Timothy Leary, of course, was still a respected professor in those days.

RU: Semi-respected.

DT: (Laughs) And she asked his help. She was setting up these acid experiments involving some of the more prominent men in Washington. She was doing this through their mistresses and wives. Apparently, she has some of these sessions, and she thought they were succeeding quite well. But one day she came back to Leary in a panic and told him things had gone terribly awry. One of the women had sort of gone public and exposed what was happening. And Mary was very alarmed about what the consequences would be and even asked if she could hide out at Leary’s…

RU: …at Millbrook. Not a great place to hide out. A big estate, but probably spied upon just as much as the White House!

DT: Leary lost touch with her a while and JFK was assassinated. About a year after the assassination, he looked up Mary Meyer and found out to his horror that she had also died a violent death while walking on a towpath along a canal in Washington. In broad daylight, a man came up to her and killed her, execution style — shot her through the head and the heart. She wasn’t sexually violated and nothing was stolen. It was just an execution-style murder that was never solved.

And this from her wikipedia:

Mary Meyer and John F Kennedy reportedly had “about 30 trysts” and at least one author has claimed she brought marijuana or LSD to almost all of these meetings.[1][2] In January 1963 Philip Graham disclosed the Kennedy-Meyer affair to a meeting of newspaper editors but his claim was not reported by the news media.[2] Leary later claimed Mary influenced Kennedy’s “views on nuclear disarmament and rapprochement with Cuba.” In an interview with Nina Burleigh, Kennedy aide Meyer Feldman said, “I think he might have thought more of her than some of the other women and discussed things that were on his mind, not just social gossip.” Burleigh wrote, “Mary might actually have been a force for peace during some of the most frightening years of the cold war…”[4]

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December 19, 2008 at 5:19 pm

>I need help I can’t do it alone

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November 14, 2008 at 5:53 am

>seyonara, white house

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November 13, 2008 at 6:19 am

Posted in jacqueline kennedy

>idiocracy

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>From here about Leonard Bernstein

“It’s no coincidence—though it was Bernstein’s immense good fortune—that his zenith came at a moment when some powerful people shared this desire. The Kennedys made their White House, in the words of Richard Hofstadter, “a center of receptivity to culture.” Bernstein performed at the Inaugural Gala, and, like Pablo Casals, E. E. Cummings, Robert Frost and other high-art luminaries, found a warm welcome throughout the Camelot years. Swept up in the notion that Americans might be able to meet not at the lowest common denominator but at the cultural peak, Bernstein was devastated by JFK’s death, which was also the death of Camelot. He dedicated his Third Symphony, “Kaddish,” to the late president….

…Still, Bernstein continued to show that the pursuit of excellence could coexist with American democracy. (It is one of the qualities that made him such an effective cultural emissary during the cold war.) But that position became decidedly lonelier after 1968, when Richard Nixon replaced the old economic resentments of presidential campaigns with obnoxious new cultural ones pitting “the silent majority” against assorted decadent elites. By the time Bernstein died in 1990, the very things he hoped might unite us had become a tool for driving us apart.

Anybody reading the papers can see how vicious the culture wars have grown. Just about any personal quality with a whiff of distinction—a hobby, a vegetable preference—can get you branded an elitist and a threat to our values. Remember how, in a desperate bid for self-preservation, John Kerry pretended four years ago he didn’t speak French? Or consider how, at this year’s Republican convention, Barack Obama was mocked by the multimillionaire former mayor of New York City and prominent opera buff Rudy Giuliani for being “cosmopolitan.” Maybe Tocqueville was right about us.

Nobody thinks that if only Sean Hannity listeners had a subtler appreciation of Mahler, they’d cozy right up to Nancy Pelosi fans, or that a wave of “Bad Dicky” revivals might heal the wounds of the body politic. But the Bernstein festival reminds us that one of our civilization’s triumphs has been finding ways to reconcile “elite” and “popular,” to stop treating the words like opposing epithets. At a time when so many other echoes of Camelot are in the air, we may yet see the return of its cultural spirit, one that few Americans have embodied as fully as Lenny Bernstein.”

Written by alexgfrank

October 20, 2008 at 3:26 am

Posted in jacqueline kennedy

>Famousssssss

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>Ron Galella, the first paparazzi and these are his famous images of Jackie who ran from him and Central Park. Ron said he thinks she ran for a combination of reasons – to distract from her daughter Caroline, but also to help her with the lawsuit she would eventually throw at him (she won).

Written by alexgfrank

September 15, 2008 at 3:42 pm

Posted in jacqueline kennedy