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>my favorite movie

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>thanks to paul contos for internet locating it for me

Written by alexgfrank

February 26, 2010 at 9:21 pm

>Gay Outlawz

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>The second in a series of posts about Gay Outlaws because I’m bored with all these safe lameasses.

Bill Miner is sort of insane, and just like our last outlaw Roger Casement, was well-moustached. Just like Jean Genet, he’s one of those dudes who will just not stop robbing people. Like on the way to the courthouse to answer charges he’ll rob you. Dude is crazy. And he liked boys, according to the Pinkerton Guards who spent like a million dollars investigating him. And like any good gay, he had a way with words, inventing the now-necessary robbery phrase “Hands Up!” when shoving a gun in peoples faces. I like Miner because he knew how to make that money. He had a few really gay nicknames, too. “The Grey Fox” was one, and “The Gentleman Robber” is another. Supposedly he was really polite when robbing people of their shit.

Written by alexgfrank

January 27, 2010 at 2:40 pm

>my purchases today

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May 10, 2009 at 10:45 pm

>The End of Treason

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>Does self interest encourage the end of reason? In Horkheimer’s The End of Reason, he carefully plots out the fallacy that is “REASON”, a dated 18th century term that ascribes essentialist justice to the character of society, a sort of noble will in collectivity. “It was supposed to order the relationships among men and to justify all the performances demanded of them,” he says, “…[and] it is from this ideal of reason that the ideas of freedom, justice and truth derived their justification.” Horkheimer’s point is what would become a basic tenant of 20th century criticism – that with ideals like reason, government and society is able to create structure. “…through reason the individual asserts or adapts himself and gets along in society. It induces the individual to subordinate himself to society…by the individuals conciousness of where his [or her] advantage lies…[and create] the proper balance between what is good for the individual and what is good for the totality.”

So where does that leave self-interest? If one is a thief without regard for some sort of reasonable moral judge, is that person making an individual statement that reason and justice can be thwarted by the individual, or is that person merely recognizing how they can get what they want in society? It strikes me that progressive revolutionaries who attempt to reform what is considered just and free still ascribe to the basic tenants of reason. The Human Rights Campaign, for instance, has much invested in theories of what is right. The organization’s ideal is that gay marriage will prevail because America, a country founded on the 18th century concepts of reason and justice, will eventually determine that legal “equality” of sexual orientation is just. Yet I wouldn’t find a gay marriage particularly subversive (with the exception of Pedro Zamora’s MTV marriage in the early 90s, but that’s a whole other story!). And while I’ve made this point a thousand times before, it seems always essential to assert an aversion to convenience.

Yes, I sympathize with those who seek justice NOW, and understand that the world is the way it is, and while we live in it, it myswell be the fairest to the most amount of people, aka, in class based capitalism based on reason, based on the fundamental precepts of American justice, yes, gays should be allowed to marry. But do these concentrations on overarching narratives of justice divert us from far more important battles that would eventually tear up the entire system of justice that our country has been based on for hundreds of years?

I think you’d be much better off stealing a copy of Horkheimer from your local Barnes & Noble then getting gay married in Maine

Written by alexgfrank

May 7, 2009 at 3:39 am

>$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

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>Can luxury be learned? I’m rather crass and would love to have the glide of the wealthy, even if I don’t have money. Divine in Our Lady Of The Flowers has an great practice:

“Divine is humble. She is aware of luxury only through a certain mystery which it secretes and which she fears. Luxury hotels, like the dens of witches, hold in thrall aggressive charms which a gesture of ours can free from marble, carpets, velvet, ebony, and crystal. As soon as she accumulated a little money, thanks to an Argentine, Divine trained herself in luxury. She bought leather and steel luggage saturated with musk. Seven or eight times a day, she would take the train, enter the Pullman car, have her bags stacked in the baggage racks, settle down on the cushions until it was time for the train to leave, and, a few seconds before the whistle blew, would call two or three porters, have her things removed, take a cab and have herself driven to a fine hotel, where she would remain long enough to install herself discreetly and luxuriously. She played this game of being a star for a whole week, and now she knows how to walk on carpets and talk to flunkeys, who are luxury furnishings. She has domesticated the charms and brought luxury down to earth.”

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December 20, 2008 at 4:29 pm

Posted in jean genet

>Don’t even talk to me about this, I would die

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December 10, 2008 at 6:37 pm

>Shame, my baby’s got me locked up in shame

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>”Crimes of which a people is ashamed constitute its real history. The same is true of man. ” – Jean Genet

What are we ashamed of at this very moment in our history? What makes us cringe?

Written by alexgfrank

December 8, 2008 at 6:38 pm

Posted in jean genet

>Four Women – Nina Simone

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>”Half as a joke, Genet once said he was interested in only four women, the Holy Virgin, Joan of Arc, Marie-Antoinette and Madame Curie. He managed to link his name to Marie-Antoinette and Joan of Arc, and in his last book even saw himself as Christ in the pieta with the Virgin.” – pg. 7 Genet: A Biography

Written by alexgfrank

November 27, 2008 at 3:10 am

Posted in jean genet, nina simone

>"Thug of genius"

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>From Edmund White’s biography of him, Jean Genet had a criminal record that could make a gal swoon. I couldn’t type it all out because it was just too long. But you get the point. The bitch stole. The bitch stole, got caught, ran away from jail, and stole on his getaway. He’s like Divine from Female Trouble, just bad and can’t stop being bad. Badness as a way of life, as an art form. “He so badddddddddddddd” You give him an inch of leway, and he’ll steal it, cross the border with it, get caught, break out and then steal something better. “What are you rebelling against? Whaddyou got?” Simone De Beauvoir called him the “Thug of Genius” Brilliant! I think it’s romantic that he only stole clothes and books, the things that matter – SIGGGH what a dreamboat. I’d let Mr. Genet steal from me anyday.

1925 April – Genet is entrusted with a small sum of money which he embezzles and spends at a carnival

1926 February – Runs away, but caught and sent back

March – Runs away again, sent to prison

1927 December – Arrested for vagrancy

1936 June – Joins army, deserts

1937 January-May – arrested for deserting

September – Arrested for stealing twelve hankerchiefs

September – Arrested for theft and carrying an illegal weapon

October – Arrested for stealing four bottles of aperitif, runs away

1939 – October – Caught stealing a shirt and a piece of silk from a department shirt

December – Arressted for stealing more cloth

1940 April – A stole suitcase and wallet are found in Genetal’s hotel room

December – Caught stealing history and philosophy books

1941 December – Chased down the street by a tailor from whom he had stolen a bolt of fabric, he is stopped, near Notre-Dame Cathedral, by a bookestore owner from whom he had lifted a volume of Proust

1942 – April – Arrested for stealing books

Written by alexgfrank

November 26, 2008 at 3:48 pm

Posted in jean genet